Staar Expository Essay Ppt

Presentation on theme: "Thesis Statements - Notes You will need to formulate a thesis statement for the STAAR Expository Essay."— Presentation transcript:

1 Thesis Statements - Notes You will need to formulate a thesis statement for the STAAR Expository Essay.

2 What is a Thesis Statement? A thesis statement presents what you intend to prove about a subject or an issue. A thesis statement must contain a subject (the topic) + an assertion (your opinion that you will prove in the paper). A thesis statement answers the prompt. The thesis statement is typically located at the end of your introduction paragraph, which sets up your thesis statement and outlines the rest of your essay.

3 Writing a Good Thesis Statement RULE 1 - A good thesis statement is short and simple. It should not be longer than one sentence.

4 Rule 1 – Example (....short & simple) Good Example: Success is a result of consistently doing the right things. Bad Example: In a world full of success gurus and books about success, it becomes ever so more important to delineate the one trait that ultimately determines success: doing the right things consistently.

5 RULE 2 - A good thesis statement is limited to one main idea.

6 Rule 2 – Example (…limited to one main idea) Good example: The key to successful dieting is focusing on a specific goal. Bad example: The key to successful dieting is focusing on a specific goal, which is also the key to successfully running a business and coaching a football team.

7 RULE 3 - A good thesis statement is a declarative sentence (forms a statement) that does not use qualifiers (might, maybe, perhaps, etc.)

8 Rule 3 – Example (…don't use might, maybe, perhaps) Good example: Kevin Durant's ability to score, rebound, and steal makes him the league’s most valuable player. Bad example: Kevin Durant’s ability to score, rebound, and steal just might make him the league’s most valuable player.

9 Thesis Statement Tips You must form an opinion and state it clearly. Do not be wishy-washy. Be sure you have approached your evidence fairly, without bias. Consider both sides of the controversial issue, and then write about the side you can prove more easily.

10 A thesis statement should NEVER contain the following: “I am going to tell you about....” “This essay examines...” “In my opinion...” “I think...” “I believe...”

11 Thesis Practice – Example 1 Prompt: What would make school less boring? Possible Answer: If cell phones were allowed in the classroom. Possible Thesis Statement: School would be less boring if cell phones were allowed in the classroom.

12 Now, let’s try the same prompt with a few different possible answers. Make sure the thesis you write supports the possible answer you are given!

13 Thesis Practice – Example 2 Prompt: Write an essay explaining whether it is always essential to tell the truth or if there are times it is better to lie. Possible Answer: You should always tell the truth. Possible Thesis Statement: It is always necessary to tell the truth no matter the circumstance or situation.

14 Thesis Practice – Example 3 Prompt: Write an essay explaining whether it is always essential to tell the truth or if there are times it is better to lie. Possible Answer: You should always be honest. Possible Thesis Statement: The most important value any human being can possess is honesty at all times.

15 Thesis Practice – Example 4 Prompt: Write an essay explaining whether it is always essential to tell the truth or if there are times it is better to lie. Possible Answer: It's ok to lie sometimes. Possible Thesis Statement: Saving someone's feelings from getting hurt is definitely a circumstance in which it is justifiable to lie.

16 Thesis Practice – Example 5 Prompt: Write an essay explaining whether it is always essential to tell the truth or if there are times it is better to lie. Possible Answer: Lying can sometimes help your relationships. Possible Thesis Statement: Sometimes telling a “little white lie” is acceptable in order to maintain a peaceful relationship.

Presentation on theme: "The staar Expository essay"— Presentation transcript:

1 The staar Expository essay
a how-to reference guide

2 The prompt: 3 minutes Start at the bottom.
Read the writing prompt first.Underline key words in the writing prompt. Look up any words you do not understand.Read the explanation above the writing prompt second.Read the quote or example in the box last.

3 Deciding what to write about: 5 minutes
If you know what you want to write about, GREAT! Write down as many examples as you can for your idea.If you are not sure, list two or three possible ideas that relate to the writing prompt.Write down as many examples for each idea as you can.Choose the idea YOU LIKE the best.If absolutely NOTHING comes to mind, try one of the following:What would your best friend write about?If you were The Most Interesting Person in the World, what would you write about?What would Ms. Harrod (or some other awesome person you admire) write about?

4 Thesis statement: 5 minutes
What is your essay going to be about?Write a clear sentence that explains what you think.Add an explanation of WHY you think that.This is your thesis statement. Your entire essay will focus on this statement; each example will be clearly tied to this statement.Make sure your thesis statement is directly related to the writing prompt. If it is not, go back and rewrite the thesis statement.

5 Plan your essay: 5 minutes
Choose your strongest example or two strongest examples.DO NOT USE MORE THAN TWO EXAMPLES!Write down as many details as you can about each example.Write down how that example relates to the writing prompt.Make a brief “road map” for your essay: what will each paragraph contain?

6 Write a rough draft: 15 minutes
In your testing booklet, write a rough draft of your essay.DO NOT SKIP THIS STEP!!!Start with your thesis statement.Jump right in discussing your example.Your second paragraph should include as much detail as possible about the example, stopping to explain how this relates to your thesis periodically.Your last paragraph should provide closure to the example, show how it explains your thesis, and create a lasting image for your reader.DO NOT CENSOR YOUR WRITING DURING THIS STAGE! Write whatever comes to mind.

7 Revise: 10 minutesIs your thesis statement clear? Do all ideas in the essay clearly relate to the thesis?Depth: do you have enough detail? Use the “explain it to a five year old” test.Do your ideas progress logically? Does the essay follow a logical order?Do you have more than one paragraph? Are your paragraphs indented?Transitions: does the essay flow from one idea to the next?Word choice: do you use words that are meaningful and specific?Sentences: do you have a combination of short and long sentences? Are there any run-on sentences or fragments?ADD or REMOVE information where you need to. Write it directly above the line on your rough draft.

8 Proofread: 5 minutes All in past tense?
Commas with coordinating conjunctions?Subject-verb agreement?All words spelled out?End punctuation?Capital letters where they are needed?All words spelled correctly?Make corrections directly on rough draft.

9 Final draft: 5 minutesCarefully copy your rough draft onto the final draft paper (or type carefully into final draft section on computer).Do not rush the copying process.Be sure to include all revision changes you have made on the rough draft.When you are done copying the final draft, read through it ONE MORE TIME to catch any final mistakes.

10 Now do it all over againThere will be two writing prompts on the STAAR test.One is graded; one is a “field test.”Treat each essay as if it were the graded one.Allow one hour for each essay.

11 The staar Expository essay
a how-to reference guide

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