Sj S Ideal Girl Essay

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4. McCreary Centre Society Mirror Images: Weight Issues among BC youth. Adolescent Health Survey II Fact Sheet. 1998 < www.mcs.bc.ca/pdf/weight.pdf> (Version current at August 4, 2004).

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7. Neumark-Sztainer D, Story M, Hannan PJ, Perry CL, Irving LM. Weight-related concerns and behaviors among overweight and non-overweight adolescents: Implications for preventing weight-related disorders. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2002;156:171–8.[PubMed]

8. Croll J, Neumark-Sztainer D, Story M, Ireland M. Prevalence and risk and protective factors related to disordered eating behaviors among adolescents: Relationship to gender and ethnicity. J Adolesc Health. 2002;31:166–75.[PubMed]

9. Krowchuk DP, Kreiter SR, Woods CR, Sinal SH, DuRant RH. Problem dieting behaviors among young adolescents. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1998;152:884–8.[PubMed]

10. Story M, Rosenwinkel K, Himes JH, Resnick M, Harris LJ, Blum RW. Demographic and risk factors associated with chronic dieting in adolescents. Am J Dis Child. 1991;145:994–8.[PubMed]

11. Patton GC, Carlin JB, Shao Q, et al. Adolescent dieting: Healthy weight control or borderline eating disorder? J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1997;38:299–306.[PubMed]

12. Patton GC, Selzer R, Coffey C, Carlin JB, Wolfe R. Onset of adolescent eating disorders: Population based cohort study over 3 years. BMJ. 1999;318:765–8.[PMC free article][PubMed]

13. Grigg M, Bowman J, Redman S. Disordered eating and unhealthy weight reduction practices among adolescent females. Prev Med. 1996;25:748–56.[PubMed]

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15. Daee A, Robinson P, Lawson M, Turpin JA, Gregory B, Tobias JD. Psychologic and physiologic effects of dieting in adolescents. South Med J. 2002;95:1032–41.[PubMed]

16. Wertheim EH, Paxton SJ, Schutz HK, Muir SL. Why do adolescent girls watch their weight? An interview study examining sociocultural pressures to be thin. J Psychosom Res. 1997;42:345–55.[PubMed]

17. Neumark-Sztainer D, Jeffery RW, French SA. Self-reported dieting: How should we ask? What does it mean? Associations between dieting and reported energy intake. Int J Eat Disord. 1997;22:437–49.[PubMed]

18. Neumark-Sztainer D, Story M, Dixon LB, Murray DM. Adolescents engaging in unhealthy weight control behaviours: Are they at risk for other health-compromising behaviors? Am J Public Health. 1998;88:952–5.[PMC free article][PubMed]

19. Neumark-Sztainer D, Story M, French SA. Covariations of unhealthy weight loss behaviors and other high-risk behaviors among adolescents. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1996;150:304–8.[PubMed]

20. Boutelle K, Neumark-Sztainer D, Story M, Resnick M. Weight control behaviors among obese, overweight, and non-overweight adolescents. J Pediatr Psychol. 2002;27:531–40.[PubMed]

21. Neumark-Sztainer D, Story M, Falkner NH, Beuhring T, Resnick MD. Sociodemographic and personal characteristics of adolescents engaged in weight loss and weight/muscle gain behaviors: Who is doing what? Prev Med. 1999;28:40–50.[PubMed]

22. Neumark-Sztainer D, Story M, Resnick MD, Blum RW. Lessons learned about adolescent nutrition from the Minnesota Adolescent Health Survey. J Am Diet Assoc. 1998;98:1449–56.[PubMed]

23. French SA, Story M, Neumark-Sztainer D, Downes B, Resnick M, Blum R. Ethnic differences in psychosocial and health behaviour correlates of dieting, purging and binge eating in a population-based sample of adolescent females. Int J Eat Disord. 1997;22:315–22.[PubMed]

24. Van den Berg P, Wertheim EH, Thompson JK, Paston SJ. Development of body image, eating disturbance and general psychological functioning in adolescent females: A replication using covariance structure modeling in an Australian sample. Int J Eat Disord. 2002;32:46–51.[PubMed]

25. Barker M, Robinson S, Wilman C, Barker DJ. Behaviour, body composition and diet in adolescent girls. Appetite. 2000;35:161–70.[PubMed]

26. Gruber AJ, Pope HG, Jr, Lalonde JK, Hudson JI. Why do young women diet? The roles of body fat, body perception, and body ideal. J Clin Psychiatry. 2001;62:609–11.[PubMed]

27. Tremblay MS, Willms JD. Secular trends in the body mass index of Canadian children. CMAJ. 2000;163:1429–33. Erratum in: 2001;164:970. [PMC free article][PubMed]

28. Pesa J. Psychosocial factors associated with dieting behaviours among female adolescents. J Sch Health. 1999;69:196–201.[PubMed]

29. French SA, Leffert N, Story M, Neumark-Sztainer D, Hannan P, Benson PL. Adolescent binge/purge and weight loss behaviors: Associations with developmental assets. J Adolesc Health. 2001;28:211–21.[PubMed]

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34. Byely L, Archibald AB, Graber J, Brooks-Gunn J. A prospective study of familial and social influences on girls’ body image and dieting. Int J Eat Disord. 2000;28:155–64.[PubMed]

35. Baker CW, Whisman MA, Brownell KD. Studying intergenerational transmission of eating attitudes and behaviors: Methodological and conceptual questions. Health Psychology. 2000;19:376–81.[PubMed]

36. Smolak L, Levine MP, Schermer F. Parental input and weight concerns among elementary school children. Int J Eat Disord. 1999;25:263–71.[PubMed]

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41. Dunkley TL, Wertheim EH, Paxton SJ. Examination of a model of multiple sociocultural influences on adolescent girls’ body dissatisfaction and dietary restraint. Adolescence. 2001;36:265–79.[PubMed]

42. Paxton SJ, Schutz HK, Wertheim EH, Muir SL. Friendship clique and peer influences on body image concerns, dietary restraint, extreme weight-loss behaviors, and binge eating in adolescent girls. J Abnorm Psychol. 1999;108:255–66.[PubMed]

43. Gilbody SM, Kirk SF, Hill AJ. Vegetarianism in young women: Another means of weight control? Int J Eat Disord. 2000;26:87–90.[PubMed]

44. Sherwood NE, Neumark-Sztainer D, Story M, Beuhring T, Resnick MD. Weight-related sports involvement in girls: Who is at risk for disordered eating. Am J Health Promo. 2002;16:341–4. ii.[PubMed]

45. Koff E, Rierdan J. Advanced pubertal development and eating disturbance in early adolescent girls. J Adolesc Health. 1993;14:433–9.[PubMed]

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47. French SA, Perry CL, Leon GR, Fulkerson JA. Weight concerns, dieting behavior, and smoking initiation among adolescents: A prospective study. Am J Public Health. 1994;84:1818–20.[PMC free article][PubMed]

48. French SA, Jeffery RW. Consequences of dieting to lose weight: Effects on physical and mental health. Health Psychol. 1994;13:195–212.[PubMed]

49. Howard CE, Porzelius LK. The role of dieting in binge eating disorder: Etiology and treatment implications. Clin Psychol Rev. 1999;19:25–44.[PubMed]

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"I haven't read anyone who writes more incisively and provocatively about the way we live now than Michelle Orange. She's a master essayist and our very best modern critic." --Stephen Elliott, author of "The Adderall Diaries"

"Reading Michelle Orange is like getting swept up in a long, stimulating conversation. Orange is fearlessly brainy and forthcoming, and she unstitches cultural assumptions with dexterity and wit. "This Is Running for Your Life "is a collection of argument, observation, and personal revelation that left me thoughtful and entertained." --Leanne Shapton, author of "Swimming Studies"

"Smart, sophisticated, and quirky, these essays showcase an original voice that uncannily captures the broodings and shadings of a generation." --Philip Lopate

"A sprawling, maximalist journey into the existential and cultural dramas of late twentieth-/early twenty-first-century North American life. Michelle Orange gives us the contents of her very interesting mind along with a healthy dose of her very good soul." --Meghan Daum, author of "My Misspent Youth" and "Life Would Be Perfect If I Lived In That House"

"With profound clarity and sly, pointed humor, Michelle Orange peels back the skin of our modern world. I love this damn book!" -- Davy Rothbart, author of "My Heart Is an Idiot"

"I haven't read anyone who writes more incisively and provocatively about the way we live now than Michelle Orange. She's a master essayist and our very best modern critic." --Stephen Elliott, author of "The Adderall Diaries"

"In this whip-smart, achingly funny collection, film critic Orange ("The Sicily Papers") trains her lens on aging, self-image, and the ascendancy of the marketing demographic, among other puzzles of the Facebook generation . . . [this is] a collection whose voice feels at once fresh and inevitable." --"Publishers Weekly"

"Michelle Orange is a crystal clear thinker--funny, lucid, warm and enthusiastic. And "This Is Running For Your Life "is an important treasure trove of irresistible ideas, information and memories. I found it a delight." --Jami Attenberg, author of "The Middlesteins"

"Reading Michelle Orange is like getting swept up in a long, stimulating conversation. Orange is fearlessly brainy and forthcoming, and she unstitches cultural assumptions with dexterity and wit. "This Is Running for Your Life "is a collection of argument, observation, and personal revelation that left me thoughtful and entertained." --Leanne Shapton, author of "Swimming Studies"

"Smart, sophisticated, and quirky, these essays showcase an original voice that uncannily captures the broodings and shadings of a generation." --Philip Lopate

"A sprawling, maximalist journey into the existential and cultural dramas of late twentieth-/early twenty-first-century North American life. Michelle Orange gives us the contents of her very interesting mind along with a healthy dose of her very good soul." --Meghan Daum, author of "My Misspent Youth" and "Life Would Be Perfect If I Lived In That House"

"With profound clarity and sly, pointed humor, Michelle Orange peels back the skin of our modern world. I love this damn book!" -- Davy Rothbart, author of "My Heart Is an Idiot"

"I haven't read anyone who writes more incisively and provocatively about the way we live now than Michelle Orange. She's a master essayist and our very best modern critic." --Stephen Elliott, author of "The Adderall Diaries"

"In the opening essay in this engrossing collection, a book that restores one's hope for the future of intelligent life on earth, Orange introduces 'the theory of receptivity, ' a phrase that neatly describes the source of her fathoming inquiries. In this extended thought piece, written, as is every selection, with an ensnaring mix of intense curiosity, personal disclosures, buoyant wit, and harpooning precision, Orange considers the ways technology has altered time and asks why nostalgia is 'now such an integral part of American culture.' Film critic, journalist, and writer Orange's great passion, and her inquiry into permutations of the cinematic 'dream girl, ' from Marilyn Monroe to today's 'approachably edgy,

adorably frantic, ' but damaged pixies, unveils crucial aspects of our 'collective imagination.' Incisive analysis of the impact of social media is matched by a poignant dispatch on her nervy 2008 sojourn in Beirut and a startlingly profound report on what was actually at stake at an American Psychiatric Association conference. Orange's receptivity is acute, her mastery of language thrilling, and her interpretations of the forces transforming our lives invigorating." "--"Donna Seaman, "Booklist"

"In this whip-smart, achingly funny collection, film critic Orange ("The Sicily Papers") trains her lens on aging, self-image, and the ascendancy of the marketing demographic, among other puzzles of the Facebook generation . . . [this is] a collection whose voice feels at once fresh and inevitable." --"Publishers Weekly"

"Michelle Orange's mind and her work are splendid, original, absolutely thrilling." --Kurt Andersen, author of "True Believers"

"Michelle Orange is a crystal clear thinker--funny, lucid, warm and enthusiastic. And "This Is Running For Your Life "is an important treasure trove of irresistible ideas, information and memories. I found it a delight." --Jami Attenberg, author of "The Middlesteins"

"Reading Michelle Orange is like gettin

"[Michelle Orange] writes generously and thoughtfully about the way mass culture molds the human heart . . . bighearted, unsentimental, and very smart." --Eugenia Williamson, "Bookforum "

"A brilliant collection of essays on modern life, and ways that technology and connectivity are changing how we interact with the world . . . The title of a new collection of essays from critic Michelle Orange, "This Is Running For Your Life, " is so striking in part because it is such an unspoken but recognizable feeling about the way we currently spend our time on earth." "As Orange brilliantly breaks down the state of modern life and how it stands in relation to technology and the commoditized image, she tells us much of what we already have intuited, but might have been afraid to admit to ourselves . . . This book is not only a comprehensive cultural portrait of our relationship with technology but also time itself, in the changing ways that we mediate it and consume it." --Nicholas Mancusi, " The Daily Beast"

"The great fun of Michelle Orange's "This Is Running for Your Life" is in watching an essayist build associations between seemingly unconnected topics--James Dean and Michael Jackson, air travel and old age, Hawaii and DSM-5--with all the ease and agility of a master craftsman . . . it would it would be difficult to name another cultural critic who brings such a high level of intellectual rigor to her subject. Her essays are funny, but not frivolous; sharp, but not brittle. "This Is Running for Your Life" is thoughtful, heartfelt, witty and deeply impressive . . . In Orange's writing, the individual gives way to the art (and vice versa), each illuminating the other . . . An abiding intelligence guides readers through the pages, and it's gratifying to encounter a writer with such a strong ability to balance the personal and the critical . . . It's a good book for readers who like to think as they read, and an excellent corrective for those of us who may h

"A brave, new, and sometimes thrillingly difficult collection of essays . . . ["This Is Running for Your Life"] jolted me sideways with ideas that were both immediately accessible and weirdly deep . . . [It's] it's a joy to come across someone who has so much to say and who says it with such force and originality. From persistence of vision to persistence of image, Orange embraces such a wide range of concerns that while reading "This is Running for Your Life" I had the feeling I had when I was in university: that there is more to the world than I thought, and that it was worth the time to pause and consider it." --Michael Redhill, "The National Post"

"There's a wonderful balance between high and low art in this book, and a terrific streak of irreverence . . . In [one] stand out piece Orange recalls her time in Honolulu at the 2011 conference of the American Psychiatric Association--a hilarious and fascinating essay that approaches David Foster Wallace at his best . . . Orange tackles disparate elements with ease, and her essay col lection is smart, funny and fiercely original." --Carmela Ciuraru, " San Francisco Chronicle"

"The book's diverse subject matter is unified by [Orange's] keen critical eye, acerbic sense of humor, and a writing style that crackles with wit and insight. Each piece braids multiple narrative and thematic threads to create almost an impressionistic interpretation of how we experience, negotiate and document the times in which we live." --Pasha Malla, "The Believer"

"Michelle Orange has made a name for herself as a social and aesthetic observer who eschews bromides and empty sentiment. Droll, honest, and incisive, her writing glides effortlessly between artistic criticism and per sonal anecdote." --"Harper's"

"Orange's insights share their probing, persuasive rhythms with those of Susan Sontag . . . [An] unfailingly X-ray-like inquiry into the peculiarities of our ultra-mediated world unites Orange's 10 absorbingT

"What a marvelous--really, a marvel--journalist and thinker Michelle Orange is. I am so engrossed in these culturally astute essays about everything from Canadian retirement homes to Manic Pixie Dream Girls." --Sloane Crosley, NPR.org

"A brave, new, and sometimes thrillingly difficult collection of essays . . . ["This Is Running for Your Life"] jolted me sideways with ideas that were both immediately accessible and weirdly deep . . . [It's] it's a joy to come across someone who has so much to say and who says it with such force and originality. From persistence of vision to persistence of image, Orange embraces such a wide range of concerns that while reading "This is Running for Your Life" I had the feeling I had when I was in university: that there is more to the world than I thought, and that it was worth the time to pause and consider it." --Michael Redhill, "The National Post"

"There's a wonderful balance between high and low art in this book, and a terrific streak of irreverence . . . In [one] stand out piece Orange recalls her time in Honolulu at the 2011 conference of the American Psychiatric Association--a hilarious and fascinating essay that approaches David Foster Wallace at his best . . . Orange tackles disparate elements with ease, and her essay col lection is smart, funny and fiercely original." --Carmela Ciuraru, " San Francisco Chronicle"

"The book's diverse subject matter is unified by [Orange's] keen critical eye, acerbic sense of humor, and a writing style that crackles with wit and insight. Each piece braids multiple narrative and thematic threads to create almost an impressionistic interpretation of how we experience, negotiate and document the times in which we live." --Pasha Malla, "The Believer"

"Michelle Orange has made a name for herself as a social and aesthetic observer who eschews bromides and empty sentiment. Droll, honest, and incisive, her writing glides effortlessly between artistic criticism and per son

A "New Yorker" Best Book of 2013A "Flavorwire" Best Nonfiction Book of 2013A "Largehearted Boy" Best Nonfiction Book of 2013"[A] well-assembled essay book can be as charismatic as a new rock album, especially if it introduces you to a youngish author whose work you'd previously missed. This was the case, for me, with Michelle Orange's first collection: an assembly of ten stylish, rangy, slightly weird essays that cover topics from the city of Beirut to digital photography. Orange's style is at once narrowly personal and intellectually ambitious, and offered more surprises than I'd expected." --Nathan Heller, "NewYorker.com""Considering the remarkably strong voice -- one that's sardonic enough to laugh at the darkness just a bit -- and sharp mind Orange brings to "This Is Running for Your Life," you might assume that the author is an old hand at this sort of thing, with plenty of essay collections to her name. In fact, this is her first. Especially in a year when so many writers were trying to say "Goodbye to All That," Michelle Orange was more subtly earning her place as of one of Joan Didion's heirs. All we can do is sit back and hope she keeps running with it." --Jason Diamond, "Flavorwire"

"What a marvelous--really, a marvel--journalist and thinker Michelle Orange is. I am so engrossed in these culturally astute essays about everything from Canadian retirement homes to Manic Pixie Dream Girls." --Sloane Crosley, NPR.org

"A brave, new, and sometimes thrillingly difficult collection of essays . . . ["This Is Running for Your Life"] jolted me sideways with ideas that were both immediately accessible and weirdly deep . . . [It's] it's a joy to come across someone who has so much to say and who says it with such force and originality. From persistence of vision to persistence of image, Orange embraces such a wide range of concerns that while reading "This is Running for Your Life" I had the feeling I had when I was in university: that there is more to the world than I thought, and that it was worth the time to pause and consider it." --Michael Redhill, "The National Post"

"There's a wonderful balance between high and low art in this book, and a terrific streak of irreverence . . . In [one] stand out piece Orange recalls her time in Honolulu at the 2011 conference of the American Psychiatric Association--a hilarious and fascinating essay that approaches David Foster Wallace at his best . . . Orange tackles disparate elements with ease, and her essay col lection is smart, funny and fiercely original." --Carmela Ciuraru, " San Francisco Chronicle"

"The book's diverse subject matter is unified by [Orange's] keen critical eye, acerbic sense of humor, and a writing style that crackles with wit and insight. Each piece braids multiple narrative and thematic threads to create almost an impressionistic interpretation of how we experience, negotiate and document the times in which we live." --Pasha Malla, "The Believer"

"Michelle Orange has made a name for herself as a social and aesthetic observer who eschews bromides and empty sentiment. Droll, honest, and incisive, her writing glides effortlessly between artistic criticism and per sonal anecdote." --"Harper's"

"Orange's insights share their probing, persuasive rhythms with those of Susan Sontag . . . [An] unfailingly X-ray-like inquiry into the peculiarities of our ultra-mediated world unites Orange's 10 absorbing essays." --M. Allen Cunningham, "Portland Oregonian"

"Reading Michelle Orange is like having a moving, one-sided conversation with your best friend if your best friend was feeling particularly astute that day." --"The Village Voice"

"This essay collection cuts through cultural preconceptions and offers insight into our changing world with clarity, intelligence, and a truly original voice." --"Largehearted Boy"

"[Michelle Orange] writes generously and thoughtfully about the way mass culture molds the human heart . . . bighearted, unsentimental, and very smart." --Eugenia Williamson, "Bookforum "

"A brilliant collection of essays on modern life, and ways that technology and connectivity are changing how we interact with the world . . . The title of a new collection of essays from critic Michelle Orange, "This Is Running For Your Life, " is so striking in part because it is such an unspoken but recognizable feeling about the way we currently spend our time on earth." "As Orange brilliantly breaks down the state of modern life and how it stands in relation to technology and the commoditized image, she tells us much of what we already have intuited, but might have been afraid to admit to ourselves . . . This book is not only a comprehensive cultural portrait of our relationship with technology but also time itself, in the changing ways that we mediate it and consume it." --Nicholas Mancusi, " The Daily Beast"

"The great fun of Michelle Orange's "This Is Running for Your Life" is in watching an essayist build associations between seemingly unconnected topics--James Dean and Michael Jackson, air travel and old age, Hawaii and DSM-5--with all the ease and agility of a master craftsman . . . it would it would be difficult to name another cultural critic who brings such a high level of intellectual rigor to her subject. Her essays are funny, but not frivolous; sharp, but not brittle. "This Is Running for Your Life" is thoughtful, heartfelt, witty and deeply impressive . . . In Orange's writing, the individual gives way to the art (and vice versa), each illuminating the other . . . An abiding intelligence guides readers through the pages, and it's gratifying to encounter a writer with such a strong ability to balance the personal and the critical . . . It's a good book for readers who like to think as they read, and an excellent corrective for those of us who may have fallen out of the habit." --S. J. Culver, "Minneapolis Star-Tribune"

""

"With its stew of high and low cul-tural ref-er-ences and extremely con-fi-dent voice, Orange's essay col-lec-tion "This is Run-ning for your Life" dis-plays a crack-ling brain choos-ing to turn its atten-tion to an array of top-ics and ideas." --Meg Wolitzer, NPR.org

"Orange offers glimpses of the emo-tional root struc-ture of her own asso-cia-tive ten-den-cies, demon-strat-ing how exca-vat-ing analo-gies every-where is a form of gen-eros-ity but also a symp-tom of hunger: for sense, for con-nec-tion, for accumulation . . . At the cen-ter of her book is a stub-born fas-ci-na-tion with how imper-fectly we know one another and our own col-lec-tive past. But there is a deep ten-der-ness in how she picks apart our imperfection--a beat-ing heart deliv-er-ing oxy-gen to her acro-batic intellect--and it's this qual-ity of intel-li-gent ten-der-ness that con-nects her voice most pal-pa-bly to [that of Rebecca Sol-nit]." --Leslie Jamison, "The New Republic"

"It is not an exag-ger-a-tion to say that Orange has per-fected the art of the per-sonal essay, seam-lessly weav-ing her own his-tory with our col-lec-tive expe-ri-ence, and effort-lessly ref-er-enc-ing dra-mas both small and large to back up her points. In these 10 diverse pieces, she ele-gantly com-bines his-tor-i-cal, pop-cultural, and per-sonal ele-ments, tak-ing read-ers on well-researched, acces-si-ble jour-neys through feel-ings and facts." --Stacey May Fowles, "Quill and Quire "(starred review)

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