Simple But Effective Cover Letter Samples

Samples of the Best Cover Letters

Cover Letter Examples Listed by Type of Job and Letter

When applying for a job, you should always include a cover letter. Even if a job listing does not specifically request a cover letter, it can be a terrific way to summarize your skills and experiences, and explain (in more detail than a resume) why you are an ideal candidate for the job.

It's important to write a letter that specifies what makes you one of the best candidates for the position. Your cover letter should be well written, and should be targeted to the position for which you are applying.

Make connections between your experiences and the skills required to excel in the job. Your cover letter is one of the first thing the hiring manager will see (along with your resume), so make sure it grabs the reader’s attention.

Use these cover letter samples to get ideas for your own cover letters, so you can show employers why you should be selected for an interview.

How to Use Cover Letter Samples

Cover letter samples are a great place to start before writing your own letter. Read through some of the samples below, focusing on ones related to your industry.

These samples can help you format your letter. They can also give you ideas for the language you might want to use, and the information you should include.

However, be sure to customize your letter to fit your own skills and experience, and the job for which you are applying. You can also alter the format of a resume example. For instance, if the example has three paragraphs, and you only want to include two paragraphs, you can do so.

Also be sure to read this list of tips for writing a strong cover letter, and this detailed cover letter guide. If you are having trouble with a particular section of your cover letter, check out these articles on cover letter salutations, cover letter closings, and parts of a cover letter.

Best Cover Letter Samples

Review an alphabetical list of great cover letter examples listed by occupation, as well as by type of cover letter.

 Use these examples to get ideas for your own cover letters.

A - E

·       Academic Advisor

·       Academic Cover Letter

·       Academic Cover Letter (science)

·       Administration/Business

·       Administrative Coordinator

·       Admissions Counselor

·       Applying for More Than One Job

·       Arts

·       Assistant

·       Athletic Director

·       Biomedical Engineer

·       Block Format Cover Letter

·       Business/Technical (with referral)

·       Camp Counselor

·       Career Change

·       Cold Contact Cover Letter

·       College Graduate

·       College Graduate

·       College Student

·       Communications

·       Communications Director (email cover letter)

·       Construction Management

·       Consultant

·       Cook

·       Customer Service

·       Database Administrator

·       Development/Museum Position

·       Director of Operations

·       eCommerce

·       Editorial

·       Editorial Assistant (email cover letter)

·       Education

·       Education/Alternative Education

·       Email Cover Letters

·       Employee Referral

·       Entry Level (analyst)

·       Entry Level (finance) 

·       Entry Level (marketing)

·       Event Planner

F - M

·       Faculty Position

·       Finance Internship

·       Flight Attendant

·       Freelance

·       Front End Web Developer

·       Golf Caddy

·       Hair Stylist

·       Higher Education Communications

·       Information Security Analyst

·       Informational Meeting Request Letter

·       Internal Marketing (with referral)

·       Internship

·       Job Promotion Cover Letters (communications and retail)

·       Job Transfer Request Letter

·       Job Transfer Request Letter Example (relocation)

·       Legal

·       Letter of Interest

·       Letter of Interest

·       Librarian

·       Lifeguard

·       Market Research Analyst

·       Marketing Assistant (college student)

·       Media Relations (college graduate)

N - R

·       Nanny

·       Networking Cover Letters

·       Occupational Therapist

·       Office Assistant (part-time)

·       Organizer

·       Part-Time Job

·       Photographer

·       Physical Therapist

·       Programmer Analyst

·       Promotion

·       Prospecting Letter

·       Receptionist

·       Recruiting Manager

·       Referral

·       Referred by a Contact

·       Request a Meeting

·       Research Technician

·       Retail Management

S - Z

·       Salary History

·       Salary Range

·       Salary Requirements

·       Sales

·       Sales Associate (summer)

·      

The trouble with cover letters is that they need to be concise and must never be longer than a one-pager. Employers are busy professionals who have 10-20 seconds to skim your cover letter – so it’s important to state your case clearly and to the point.

How to cram lots of information into little space:

It’s not as difficult as it seems. Less really is more when it comes to crafting a cover letter that hits home. It’s a simple matter of focusing your time and attention on the essentials, basically the items an employer is most interested in. Here’s 5 ways you can do just that.

1. Three paragraphs

Start with creating three paragraphs on one page. In the first one, tell the reader what job you are applying for and why. In the second you list your skills and experience. And in the third paragraph, clearly and directly ask for the opportunity to have an interview to discuss things further.

2. Stay concise

Make sure you limit each paragraph to three or four well-written sentences, cutting out all the fluff and non-essentials. These could well be the most important sentences you write in your career, so take your time to ensure they are compelling and inspire the reader to want to see your resume and even call you for an interview today.

3. Layout

Leave generous margins so there’s plenty of white space and be sure to double space between paragraphs. This will make the cover letter more pleasing on the eye and put the reader at ease.

 4. Facilitate reading

Assist the reader see at a glance what you wish to say by using numbers or bullet points. You want the reader to be able get a two second snapshot of the cover letter, as most people do before they read it through.

5. Check and check again

Proof-read through to catch spelling and grammatical errors, then print it out for one final edit. When you think it looks good, send it over to friends and family and let them go through it with a fine tooth comb.

You’re done!

Now imagine how the employer will feel when he or she opens your new cover letter. Hopefully they will find a simple, clearly worded letter that contains only necessary information and with a call to action – getting you in for an interview.

Conclusion

The rule of keeping things simple very much applies to cover letters. With employers being inundated with applications, they will appreciate a brief and effective letter like yours. The next step will be to keep your resume short and sweet to stay consistent with your punchy new cover letter.

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Tags: Cover LettereffectiverulessimpleWriting

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